Effects & Design Tips


Offset lenticular production supports the following lenticular effects: Flip, Morph, 3D, Animation, Video Grab, or a combination thereof.

3D

Lenticular 3D provides a pleasantly peculiar version of 3D which has its own unique appeal. It is more engaging than flat motionless print, entertains, fascinates and breaks through consumer's indifference. It is highly effective in attracting attention, increasing dwell time and improving sales figures. Moreover, consumers will pay more for a product featuring a 3D effect than one that doesn't since such items are perceived as having a higher value and collectable.

In lenticular 3D, objects are distributed within the scene at different spatial levels and "sculptured" into their 3D forms. 

 

Design Tips:

The same visual cues we use in everyday life to inform us of which object is closer or farther than another is just as pertinent for 3D lenticular design

  • Use partial overlap of objects
  • Use perspective (convergence of lines) to enhance the illusion of depth
  • Use larger, less detailed elements for those that will project forward off the print surface
  • Use a sharply focused background layer with good detail 
  • Do not use white or solid colours as a background -these provide no depth cues (references) and lighter colours also give rise to ghosting
  • Key objects should not contrast excessively with the background
  • Avoid the use of horizontal lines as they provide no depth clue

Be aware:

  • Artwork must be properly layered to avoid extra costs
  • Objects which overlap must be separated on individual layers AND you must clone in the area on the layer from which you cut out the foreground element
  • The more layers you provide the more convincing the depth effect will be
  • The further elements are postioned before or aft the print's surface, the softer they become
  • Audiences don't tolerate unsharp text, logos, and eyes -these will need to be positioned by us at or near the print's surface
  • A mediocre 2D image will still look mediocre in 3D

 

The Flip Effect turns specific visual elements on and off or replaces one image with another. It is most commonly used to demonstrate:

  • Old and New or Before and After
  • Cause and Effect
  • With and Without
  • Day and Night
  • State 1 and State 2 
  • Colour 1 and Colour 2
  • Language 1 and Language 2

 

Design Tips:

In order to achieve the optimum Flip effect it is imperative to reduce regions of high contrast between images which cause distracting ghosting, i.e. the underlying image bleeding through.

Flip elements should:

  • Be similar in shape, size, position and tone e.g. try to superimpose outlines and facial features
  • Not contrast excessively with each other nor their own backgrounds
  • Have the same or a similar background, or use a similar colour palette

Flip designs:

  • Should not use white or light coloured backgrounds -unless each image has white or light colours in the exact same areas. 
  • Should use "busy" detailed, colourful or patterned backgrounds with mid tone colours i.e. not too dark or too light
  • Should not use very dark backgrounds in order to avoid overpowering the other flip image/s and darkening them
  • Should not use fine lines nor italic text since all diagonal lines will display a degree of "staircasing"
  • Should use large bold text with a minimum line thickness of 0.4mm

For best results:

  • For hand-held prints, always choose a head-to-tail Flip direction in preference to a side-to-side Flip
  • Consider confining the Flip effect to the middle two-thirds of the print particularly for larger size pieces
  • Position copious text and information on the backside
  • If text is to change then it's preferable not to overlap flipping text, and in such cases avoid white text on a dark background

Failure to adhere to the above recommendations will result in less satisfactory outcomes.

A Morph effect "plays" the transformation of subject A into subject B by way of a series of intermediate transition frames

 

Design Tips:

Morph subjects should:

  • Be confined to a portion of the print
  • Be provided on their own transparent layer separate to the background
  • Be similar in shape, size, position and tone -try to superimpose like features
  • Not contrast excessively with each other nor their background
  • Have a common background with good detail

Morph designs:

  • MUST NOT use a white or light tone solid background
  • MUST NOT use a very dark background
  • Should use a medium tone background with good image detail

 

A visual element or the entire image appears to move forward increasing in size as it does

 

Design Tips:

The Zoom subject should:

  • Have a true resolution of 300 ppi at its largest size i.e. avoid enlarging & resampling up from its smallest size
  • Be provided on its own transparent layer separate to the background
  • Have a layer assigned to its initial size and position
  • Have a layer assigned to its final size and position
  • Not contrast excessively with its background

Zoom designs:

  • MUST NOT use a white or light tone solid background
  • MUST NOT use a very dark background
  • Should use a medium tone background with good image detail

For best results:

  • Confine the Zoom subject and its trajectory to a portion of the print
  • Zoom from straight on or at a slight angle
  • Don't let the Zoom subject track excessively horizontally (or grow too wide) as it will appear fuzzy

 

The Animation effect comprises of a series of sequential images to convey subject movement:

  • Type 1 -there is a definite start and finish point
  • Type 2 -the image series “loops” e.g. a spinning propellar with no definite start or end point

Footage may be computer generated or sourced from time lapse photography

 

Design Tips:

The Animation subject should:

  • Not have high contrast areas within itself
  • Not contrast excessively with its background
  • Not track excessively horizontally as it will appear fuzzy

Animation designs:

  • Typically comprise of at least 4 frames (and can contain 120+ images with Photogram's Hyper-Motion products)
  • MUST NOT use a white or light tone solid background
  • Should use a medium tone background with good image detail
  • Should use a single static background throughout the Animation

For best results:

  • Use a simple, sequential action with small incremental movement between frames
  • Maintain the action centred on the one spot

Be aware:

  • Fewer frames will have a more stuttered movement, but be seen with greater clarity
  • More frames will lend themselves to smoother movement, but be less distinguished
  • Not all sequences are candidates for Animation -complex movements are definitely not

 

 

Uses a series of sequential images to convey subject movement:

  • Type 1 -there is a definite start and finish point
  • Type 2 -there is a continuous "looping" movement without a discernible start and finish e.g. skipping on the spot

Footage is typically from a video camera, motion picture film, high-speed photography, or a digital camera in burst (continuous fire) mode

 

Design Tips:

The Video Motion subject should:

  • Not have high contrast areas within itself
  • Not contrast excessively with its background
  • Not track excessively horizontally as it will appear fuzzy

Video Motion:

  • Must be recorded with the camera on a tripod
  • Footage must be stabilised with the main action centred on the one spot
  • MUST NOT use a white or light tone solid background
  • MUST NOT use a very dark background
  • Should use a medium tone background with good image detail
  • Should maintain a static background throughout the image sequence

For best results:

  • Use a simple action
  • Use footage with small incremental movement between frames

Be aware:

  •  In type 1, the first and last frames are given heaviest weight to “anchor” the content, whilst the in-between frames will convey movement at the expense of clarity
  • More frames will lend themselves to smoother movement, but be less defined individually
  • That the footage aspect ratio may not correspond with the lenticular print:
    • HD 720 shot landscape is only suitable for landscape business cards
      • HD 720 = 1280 x 720 px = 108 x 61 mm @ 300 ppi
    • HD 720 shot portrait is only suitable for portrait business cards
      • HD 720 = 720 x 1280 px = 61 x 108 mm @ 300 ppi
    • HD 1080 is suitable for business cards of either orientation
      • HD 1080 = 1920 x 1080 px = 163 x 91 mm @ 300 ppi
    • HD 1080 shot landscape is only just suitable for A6 landscape
      • HD 1080 = 1920 x 1080 px = 163 x 91 mm @ 300 ppi
    • HD 1080 shot portrait is only just suitable for A6 portrait
      • HD 1080 = 1080 x 1920 px = 91 x 163 mm @ 300 ppi]